All posts tagged: japan

Easy Breathing With Lacunal – Fukuoka, Japan

Lacunal is a 3-dimensional support frame designed to ease breathing when wearing a neck tube or a buff for running, trekking or other forms of workout, created by Kazunori Takeishi, an architect who is proficient in 3D modelling and design. Lacunal is named after ‘lacuna’ which refers to an empty space or gap. The arch structure sits on the nose and chin, creating a ‘lacuna’ or space between the fabric of the buff and the nose and mouth, allowing greater comfort with breathing and hence improves athletic performance. The use of Lacunal can greatly ease discomfort and even lower the risk of a heat stroke. Lacunal can be used with neck tube, buff, or fabric masks. Lacunal is produced one by one via 3D printing laser sintering technology, made in lightweight nylon plastic, and can be customized to fit individual facial sizes, check the Monocircus Webshop to order. Kazunori Takeishi is also the Silver A’Design Award winner in 2014 – 2015 with his design: The Bow Tie. Together with a Singaporean artist, Lim Shin Ee, …

Kirikane Glass Fusion – Kyoto, Japan

Akane Yamamoto has achieved to set three-dimensional gold kirikane ornaments as if they were floating in between the glass layers which fully like they were fused together, a kirikane glass technique that many glassmakers experts has been trying to achieve for many decades. Kirikane is an ornamental technique which consists of cutting gold, silver, copper, tin, and platinum in lines, triangles or squares, applying them in patterns. It is said to have originated in the Orient in 300 B.C. The technique of Kirikane travelled far on the silk road before arriving in Japan in 600 A.D., along with Buddhism, and was mainly applied to Buddhist paintings and decorations. According to The Japan Times, in the British Museum’s glass collection includes a bowl with gold-leaf patterns that is estimated to have been made around 250 B.C. The gold leaf is sandwiched between two layers of glass, but the layers were never fully fused together like Akane Yamamoto’s creations. After trials and errors, Akane Yamamoto successfully set perfect timing in melting the gold patterns to be in perfect …

The Hibatouch – Amagasaki, Japan

Sachiko Nakashioya is the person behind the idea of The Hibatouch. Sachiko Nakashioya, an employee at local ironworks Hirose Engineering Co. in Amagasaki of Hyogo Prefecture, suddenly came up with the idea of making tools to touch things when she saw her son pressed a lift button and she was afraid that he might get the Covid-19 virus. The animal-shaped iron tool with the size 10 cm x 10 cm and weighs roughly 70 grams, can be used also for touchscreens by attaching conductive foam. They have cat and monkey shape variations. Hirose Enginering, a factory produces various iron products including the Hibatouch, already produced and selling the it in its webstore to avoid the people from the virus when they touch door handles, press electric buttons, hold your hands on the railings. The Hirose company refers us to its official webstore Hibanas Store with the price 1,430 Yen. Here are the images of the Hibatouch created by Sachiko Nakashioya, the Hirose Enginering employee, in Hibanas Store:…   For more information about the creator Sachiko Nakashioya …

Empress Michiko to Empress Masako – Continuing The Imperial Sericulture

Empress Michiko has kept the sericulture activities alive in the palace for decades. 2019 was her last sericulture tasks and passed it on to Empress Masako this year. On Monday 11 May 2020, the palace held a ceremony called “Goyosan Hajime no Gi” to mark the opening of the year’s silk-farming activities in Momijiyama Imperial Cocoonery in Tokyo, Japan. And during the private ceremony, Empress Masako started feeding the silkworms type – Koishimaru, with the shredded mulberry leaves for the first time. The sericulture tradition was first  started in 1871 by Empress Sho Ken. Since then, the tradition has been passing on to the next generations until today. They usually grow many kinds of silkworms, but due to the Covid-19 situation, Koishimaru type is the only one they grow this year which produce soft and strong silk fabric. Continuing the palace sericulture: below is a video about Empress Michiko and her staff during the process of the silk cultivation – from growing mulberry trees and feeding silkworms in the palace to producing fine silk cloth …

The Prismatic Cloud – Tokyo, Japan

Tokujin Yoshioka is an award winning Japanese designer who created the famous rose gold Olympic 2020 torch. One of his other creations in 2020 is The Prismatic Cloud sculpture with 10 meter length and 15 meters height is now hanging in Ginza Six Tokyo, Japan. The artwork was first created in 2008, stretched across the Alley Centre in Houston, United States, as its permanent installation art collection with more than 17.000 colorless prismatic rods. Tokujin Yoshioka said: “The Prismatic Cloud is a work to express the formless light and the cloud-like sculpture of light awakens us to the perception of natural energy”. In Ginza Six, the clouds contains 10.000 acrylic prismatic rods in 400 square-meter space. Watch the short video below from the YouTube Channel of Ginza Six :… The Prismatic Clouds also known as The Invisibles combined Tokuji’s transparent furnitures in the Kartell Gallery 2010 exhibition:… Here are images of the Prismatic Clouds and The Invisibles throughout the years:… For more information about Tokujin Yoshioka: Website www.tokujin.com – Instagram @tokujin_yoshioka – Facebook TokujinYoshioka – YouTube Channel  Tokujin …

Tokujin Yoshioka – Making Practical Face Shield

Tokujin Yoshioka, a Japanese creator of Olympic torch, shared his “Easy To Make Face Shield” in his YouTube Channel: Tokujin Yoshioka Design. His simple and practical method is easy to follow for the medical staffs who run out of safe protective gears in hospitals. Making the practical face shield: be ready with a paper, plastic, your eyeglasses, scissor, and cutter. Take wider measurement of the overall width of the eyeglasses’ frames (left to right). Below is his short tutorial video:… Here are the step by step images of the Tokujin Yoshioda’s Easy To Make Face Shield from his short video above:… For more information about Tokujin Yoshioka: Official Website http://www.tokujin.com – YouTube Channel Tokujin Yoshioka Design – Facebook Tokujin Yoshioka. Sources: Tokujin Yoshioka Official Website , and Tokujin Yoshioka Design YouTube channel.

Traditional Silk Marbling – Kyoto, Japan

Kyoto Marble workshop (dye company for silk and polyester) is run by the Nose family in Kyoto, Japan for decades. The family business, managed by Moriyoshi Nose – the son in law, and his family members has been keeping the traditional silk marbling alive. Using starch they make various patterns and manually cut the shapes then put them on rolling machine to print the fabrics. They have worked together with many fashion designers including Hermēs. Below you can see the traditional process of the silk marbling which has been improved for decades in the Kyoto Marble workshop and its collaboration with Hermēs in YouTube channels of Great Big Stories and Hermēs: … Below are some images of the Nose family and their silk marbling results in the Kyoto Marble workshop:… For more info about the Kyoto Marble: Website http://www.kyotomarble.com – Webshop Pas Deux Pareils:  http://www.marbleprint.shop-pro.jp and Instragram @kyotomarble. Sources: Kyoto Marble Official Website , Instagram @kyotomarble , Hermēs YouTube Channel , and Great Big Stories YouTube Channel